Archive for March, 2012

What Are the Benefits of Document Indexing Software?

Monday, March 19th, 2012

Steve Breault, Vircosoft Founder / CEO

Document indexing is the process of adding tags and marks to documents. These tags and marks are then stored in an index and used when someone wants to search for a document. Document indexing is normally used by engines to help retrieve information from different websites. It helps search engines to be fast in document retrieval. Document indexing can also be used by an organization which wants to optimize its filing system.

An organization which needs document indexing done automatically should use document indexing software for automation of the indexing process. There are many benefits which an organization can get from document indexing. Some of these benefits are discussed in detail below.

Faster retrieval of documents:

When the documents are indexed tags and marks are used to identify them. These tags are normally derived from the content in the documents and/or a short description used to describe the document. When a user searches the document index using a certain keyword the index quickly returns a list of documents with tags same as the searched keyword. Therefore a user can quickly select the document that he/she wants. Unlike document filing which requires a user to search the content of each file individually so as to find what he/she wants. There indexed documents are easily accessible.

Allows easy orientation for new employees:

When your organization recruits new employees you will need to familiarize them with the filing system and other aspects of the organization. With document indexing software the new employees will be quickly shown how to search for files in the organization. If you are using the old filing system for document organization then you need to go through the whole filing system so that the new employees can understand how to find files.

Faster Decision making:

In an organization decision making is normally made by using files which have important information about the organization. If the organization uses document indexing software they can quickly search through and find what need quickly enabling them to make faster decisions.

Increases efficiency and reduces running costs:

In organizations with indexed documents, document access speeds are highly increased. This makes the overall efficiency of the organization to increase especially when the organization deals with a large number of documents. When the efficiency of document retrieval is increased the running costs for document retrieval services is reduced. This is because you can employee fewer employees to do the document retrieval work.

Improved security of documents:

Tags can be used to represent security levels on documents. This can be used to restrict some users from accessing documents with certain tags. This greatly helps the organization to protect its organizational secrets.

Gaining a competitive advantage:

Many organizations do not use document indexing software. This makes their file retrieval system cumbersome. If your organization uses a document indexing and retrieval system you gain a competitive advantage. Better customer service and reduced cost are two examples.

Faster batch processing of documents:

Some documents have similar characteristics thereby they have similar tags. By using document indexing software you can quickly search through your documents and arrange them to be batch processed. Batch processing involves the manipulation of documents with similar characteristic in a queue. This also allows for faster and easy updating of documents.

Does a Paperless Office Really Mean No Paper?

Saturday, March 17th, 2012

Steve Breault, Vircosoft Founder / CEO

There are a lot of misconceptions regarding the term ‘paperless office‘. Many believe that an office or work environment termed paperless will be literally devoid of any form of printed paper. Reality, though is somewhat different!

A paperless office should really be read as a less paper office. This term is more realistic in describing many offices and company’s today. People have been talking about achieving a paperless office since the 1970’s but in reality we are a long way from achieving the dream. Technology has developed at a fast rate and many innovations have reduced the need for everything to be recorded on paper but, as cutting edge as the new equipment is, it will never be able to completely eliminate the need for paper.

Not long ago everything had to be printed and stored in a hard copy. Now massive computer memories and new technology such as I-pads have reduced the need for printouts but many businesses will still eventually print a lot of information that they have stored on hard drives and the like. Despite the advantages in electronic storage many still need a tangible copy to refer to and many will often print out copies, ‘just in case.’

Paper use in business has dropped slightly for the last few years but there has also been an increase in the sales of household printer paper. Many companies will no longer print and forward an invoice, instead choosing to electronically invoice a customer in their attempt to move toward a paperless office only for the consumer to then print out the invoice for their own records.

In reality it will be nigh on impossible to achieve a completely paperless office. Recent studies completed by Hewlett-Packard have highlighted several reasons why paperless offices remain out of reach. Firstly, comprehension of information often results in documents being printed. Many find printed words on paper easier to understand than the same words on a monitor or screen. Secondly there will always be some ‘unenlightened’ staff members who refrain from using new technology to the height of its ability, again leading to more paper cluttering the office or workspace. Lastly, and on the same note, tradition will always hinder new beliefs. Many companies and businesses still feel better communicating with customers by using a traditional letter. Of course a copy of this letter needs to be kept and this is often achieved with a paper printed copy.

As more and more offices begin to see how using less paper may lead to reduced costs we will begin to see ‘less paper’ offices but it will be a long time before we see the two thousand year use of paper completely eliminated. Future generations who are more au fait with the use of electronic devices will grasp the benefits of hard drive mass storage but until the majority of people are enlightened offices will never be totally free of paper.

The move towards paperless offices is commendable but has yet to be achieved. Less paper offices are now the norm but it would be wrong to imagine a paperless office as a reality for now. In the near future, who knows?